Baby Boomer Martial Arts Speak Wisdom?

Old karate baby boomer speaks wisdom? When you reach a certain age, say baby boomer age, ideas spin in your head; ideas, that may or may not make sense due to informational overload, years of experience doing way too many things, but yet yearning to do so much more. In the movie Shaolin, lyrics in the title song said...let me plant a seed of good will and walk this road of life together with you. Sometimes, all it takes is a seed. How we define this, is totally up to us.

As we age, we still have opportunities to learn, fulfill dreams, experience more, make a difference and help make this world a better place to live.

If you have ideas, feel free to send me your thoughts to:

babyboomersensei@gmail.com.

Friday, June 10, 2016

Martial Arts for Seniors


Retired baby boomers with time on their hand are now considering taking martial arts whether it be karate, tae kwon do, kung fu, or tai chi. Though many have joined the softer and less aggressive arts like qigong or tai chi, a percentage of them are donning cotton white gis and attending karate classes. Some old timers in denial attempt mix martial arts till they end up the emergency room: Mind is willing but the body says no. Many that have decided to go back into martial arts after retirement are those with some experience, quitting, years back as lower ranking belts returning to finally earn the coveted black belt. Some do so after watching their kids through the years take martial arts but didn’t have the guts to take it then. For whatever reason, it’s something that baby boomers want to do now; a bucket list kind of thing.

Thursday, August 13, 2015

Benefits of Tai Chi Energy: Healing and Staying Healthy

By Sensei Domi

Healing and staying healthy are things we seniors or baby boomers have on our minds.  Waking up each day with aches and pains are constant reminders.  My wife and I were at a friend's house sharing wine and conversation and aside from discussing the love for our grandchildren, and retirement, we spend a good percentage on our health, how once vibrant and athletic now reduced to taking a handful of pills to deal with arthritis, diabetes, high cholesterol and blood pressure; in essence, synthetic prescription medication to stretch the inevitable. It's the state of affairs, part of life and nature.  Embrace it, I say.  Let's forge ahead and the hell with limitations.  I may not be able to slam dunk a basketball, but I can play a mean game of horse!

So what do we do, eh?

Wednesday, August 12, 2015

People Who Practice Tai Chi Stay Mentally Sharp

As I surf the web, I do my share of reading and, in doing so, discovered this recent article (July 10, 2015) that supports the theory that those who practice tai chi regularly stay mentally sharp.  Well, that's good for me as I can attest my pencil isn't as sharp as it used to be and wonder how much dull it would be had I not practice, faithfully, my daily and early morning tai chi.  I'm going to be one to lead the charge on this, validated or not.  These articles and studies give me credence on why I promote this exercise and martial arts.  So click on the link below and get yourself practicing tai chi everyday.  It ain't no worse than taking those prescription pills every morning!!!

New Study Links Long-Term Tai Chi Mind-Body Exercise to Improved Cognitive Function in Older Adults Study Published in the July 2015 Issue of Global Advances in Health and Medicine

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

Baby Boomer Sensei Does 62 Pushups on his 62nd Birthday

Just because I practice Tai Chi and Qigong everyday, doesn't mean I can't do a push up or two.



 

Thursday, April 9, 2015

Health Buzz: Tai Chi Helpful to Heart Patients (Article Reprint)


By ANGELA HAUPT

April 26, 2011

Study: Tai Chi Improves Mood and Quality of Life for Heart Failure Patients

The ancient Chinese exercise tai chi—which blends moderate-intensity aerobics with strength training, breathing techniques, and stress management—could boost heart patients' quality of life. Researchers split 100 patients with heart failure into two groups: Half participated in a 12-week tai chi program, while the others spent 12 weeks in an educational program learning about heart-related issues, like low-sodium diets and heart-rhythm problems. At the end of the study, the tai chi group reported improvements in mood, less depression, less fatigue, and more energy than the others—and those in the first group were more likely to continue with some type of physical activity, according to findings published Monday in the Archives of Internal Medicine. "Maintaining an exercise regimen is important in heart failure," study author Gloria Yeh of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center told HealthDay. "Tai chi may be a suitable alternative or adjunct exercise for these patients."

The gentle, 2,000-year-old Chinese practice of tai chi is often described as "meditation in motion." But the Harvard Women's Health Watch newsletter suggests a more apt description is "medication in motion."

Tai chi, the most famous branch of Qigong, or exercises that harness the qi (life energy, pronounced "chee"), has been linked to health benefits for virtually everyone from children to seniors. Researchers aren't sure exactly how, but studies show that tai chi improves the quality of life for breast cancer patients and Parkinson's sufferers. Its combination of martial arts movements and deep breathing can be adapted even for people in wheelchairs. And it has shown promise in treating sleep problems and high blood pressure.

Tai chi is credited with so many pluses, physiological and psychological, that Chenchen Wang, an associate professor of medicine at Tufts University, set out in 2009 to analyze 40 studies on it in English and Chinese journals. Wang found that tai chi did indeed promote balance, flexibility, cardiovascular fitness, and strength. In a study comparing it with brisk walking and resistance training, a tai chi group improved more than 30 percent in lower-body strength and 25 percent in arm strength, nearly as much as a weight-training group and more than the walkers.